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The Pan-African Economy in Brief: Thursday, March 14, 2019

GHANA:
Imports of fish and seafood reached $311 million in 2018:
$311 million. This is the amount spent by Ghana on fish and seafood in 2018. This is revealed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in a report released today. For the Organization, this important envelope reflects the central role of fish in the household diet. Indeed, fish contributes 60% of animal protein intake and accounts for 22% of household food expenditures. In addition, Ghana's average per capita consumption is among the highest in the world at 26 kg, compared to 14 kg in West Africa and 19-20 kg worldwide...

A new mining technique under review for the Kubi gold project:
Asante Gold is currently examining the possibility of using a new mining technique on its Kubi gold project in Ghana. Called "Sustainable Mining by Drilling" (SMD), the technology is developed and commercialized by Anaconda Mining. According to the details available, it is a two-stage drilling method that allows the direct exploitation of narrow deposits. "This concept is a complete open pit mining option with a drilling rig as the main surface equipment used in conjunction with several field-proven technologies," said Anaconda...


RWANDA:
Horticulture generated $25 million in 2018:
In Rwanda, the horticultural sub-sector generated $25 million in 2018. This is reported in the Kigali daily newspaper, New Times, which quotes data from the Ministry of Agriculture and Animal Resources (MINAGRI). The amount shows an increase of $4 million over the previous year. According to details provided by Geraldine Mukeshimana, in charge of the agriculture portfolio, vegetables generated $12.9 million, fruit generated $7.8 million and floriculture revenues reached $4.1 million. The main fruits and vegetables shipped include onion, peas, tomato, carrot, mushrooms and eggplant...


KENYA:
Kenya adopts new law on the distribution of oil revenues:
Kenya has adopted a new law on the distribution of income from oil activities, it was reported on Tuesday from the Reuters news agency. The new law, promulgated by President Uhuru Kenyatta, distributes oil revenues in the Turkana region between local government, local communities and the central government. Thus, 20% of oil revenues will now be allocated to local government while communities living near oil sites will receive 5% of these revenues. The central government will receive 75% of the revenue. This new law follows a draft law adopted by parliament in 2016, which provided, among other things, for a 10% share for local communities. It had been rejected by President Uhuru Kenyatta, who had decided not to promulgate it, calling for a reduction in this share...

Three new pieces of legislation are changing the organizational landscape of the energy sector:
In Kenya, President Uhuru Kenyatta has just amended three laws relating to the energy sector. This is the Urban Areas Act, which is an amendment of existing legislation, the 2017 Petroleum Act and the 2017 Energy Act. These texts propose, among other things, the establishment of three key entities to manage and regulate the country's energy resources. These are the Energy and Petroleum Regulatory Authority, the Rural Electrification and Renewable Energy Company and the Electricity and Nuclear Energy Agency. The Energy and Petroleum Regulatory Authority will regulate the production, import, export, transmission, distribution, supply and use of electricity, with the exception of licences for nuclear power plants. It will also be in charge of regulating the import, refining, export, transport, storage and sale of oil and oil products, with the exception of crude oil...


UGANDA:
The government could withdraw the concession from Eskom for the Kiira (200 MW) and Nalubaale (180 MW) power plants:
In Uganda, the government is considering revising the terms of a power generation contract signed with Eskom, the South African electricity company, more than 10 years ago. Indeed, one of the company's subsidiaries won the concession for the 200 MW Kiira power plant, newly built at the time, in 2003. The contract also included the concession of the 180 MW Nalubaale power plant, built in the 1960s. Under the terms of the agreement, Eskom's subsidiary in Uganda was to inject $100 million into infrastructure assets over the 20-year term of the concession...